Jump to main navigation Skip to Content

DFG Logo: back to Homepage Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft

Prof. Dr. Brigitte Röder

Biological Psychology/Neuropsychology, University of Hamburg

Prof. Dr. Brigitte Röder

Prof. Dr. Brigitte Röder

© DFG / David Ausserhofer

Brigitte Röder's work is highly important to both psychology and the modern life sciences. Her work is concerned with the interfaces between cognitive psychology, developmental psychology and cognitive neuroscience. It is primarily her study of the basic mechanisms of neuroplasticity that places her among the world's foremost researchers. She attempts to answer questions such as: How and to what extent can the brain adapt to age-related changes or sensory deprivation in the case of blindness and deafness? Is it possible to “train” the adaptability of the brain? How are functionally specialised brain systems developed and maintained? Röder is specifically interested in dynamic development over time. For instance, she investigates how perception and behaviour change in people with acquired blindness or deafness, compares this with people who have been blind or deaf from birth, and analyses both in relation to cortical development. This and other work, all characterised by tremendous creativity and the combination of psychological and psychophysiological experiments, eye movement measurements and imaging techniques, are of great importance outside basic research in the development of educational and rehabilitation programmes.

Born in 1967, Brigitte Röder studied psychology in Marburg, where she wrote her doctorate in cognitive neuroscience with Frank Rösler and habilitated in 2002. She has spent several periods away from her research home, for example carrying out doctoral and postdoctoral research in Illinois and Oregon. In 1999 she became one of the first funding recipients in the DFG's Emmy Noether Programme. From Marburg she moved to the University of Hamburg, where she continues to teach and research despite receiving several offers from other institutions. She has already received a number of awards, including an ERC Advanced Grant in 2010.