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Prof. Dr. Andreas Dreizler und Prof. Dr. Christof Schulz

Combustion Research, Technical University of Darmstadt / Combustion and Gas Dynamics, University of Duisburg-Essen

Andreas Dreizler and Christof Schulz are among the world's leading experimentally oriented combustion researchers. While working at different universities, they have made an eminent and complementary contribution, including joint publications, to the same field of research: quantitative laser diagnostics of reactive flows. They are sharing a Leibniz Prize in recognition of their work.

Prof. Dr. Andreas Dreizler

Prof. Dr. Andreas Dreizler

© DFG / David Ausserhofer

Andreas Dreizler has made a large number of substantial experimental contributions to the quantitative characterisation of turbulent combustion processes. These include the world's first measurements of hydrocarbon concentrations and temperatures in flames, which could only be achieved through the ingenious use of non-linear optical effects, as well as the first quantitative imaging measurements of formaldehyde formation in self-igniting combustion engines and turbulent transport in flames with the help of laser-induced fluorescence and high-speed cameras. Most recently, Dreizler designed novel experiments to track the time-place behaviour of three-dimensional turbulent flows. Dreizler's measuring methods and results are being used all over the world to improve models of combustion. After he completed his physics degree, the foundations for his future career were laid while writing his doctorate with Jürgen Wolfrum in Heidelberg. He spent a short period in technology consulting before joining the staff of the University of Stuttgart and then the Technical University of Darmstadt, where since 2008 he has held a new professorship, Reactive Flows and Diagnostics, in the excellence cluster Smart Interfaces.

Prof. Dr. Christof Schulz

Prof. Dr. Christof Schulz

© DFG / David Ausserhofer

Christof Schulz has made crucial contributions to the key principles and technologies of high-resolution laser diagnostic measuring methods and their application in the experimental characterisation of technical combustion and particle synthesis processes. Using difficult measuring techniques, he was the first to achieve high quantitative accuracy in the monitoring of the undesired formation of nitrogen during combustion. He has also produced new insights into the kinetic mechanisms of soot formation during engine combustion. To transfer his measuring methods to technical systems such as combustion engines and gas turbines, he developed micro-optic sensors and application-specific endoscopes. Using these methods, Schulz has successfully moved into entirely new areas of science and made an important contribution to the materials sciences, for example in the development of more powerful batteries with higher capacity and longer life. After studying chemistry in Karlsruhe, Christof Schulz also completed his doctorate with Jürgen Wolfrum in Heidelberg, where he met co-recipient Andreas Dreizler. After habilitating in 2002, Schulz made several research visits to Stanford before being appointed to the University of Duisburg-Essen in 2004.