Internationality

How attractive Germany is

The movement of researchers to Germany from other countries is sometimes referred to as 'brain gain'. The Funding Atlas 2015 reveals who is coming to Germany, from which countries they originate, and where and in what scientific disciplines they are working.

Funding Atlas 2015

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Internationalisation has been a key concept in German research policy for many years. The intention is to give German research international visibility and make Germany an attractive place for researchers to work. When researchers decide to work at a German institution, they choose their institution very carefully. They consider not only subject specialisations but also the infrastructure and available finances; in other words, whether a period spent working there will benefit their career development.

According to the Funding Atlas 2015, international researchers are mainly attracted to major cities and traditional university towns. For many, Excellence Initiative funding is evidently an argument in favour of a particular destination. But the Funding Atlas also shows that small universities and non-university research institutions are the ideal choice for some, because preferences and requirements are as individual as the people themselves and their work. The statistics also indicate that career level influences the decision to relocate to Germany and the choice of institution. Graduate Schools or funding from the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD), for example, attract more early-career researchers from Asia, South America and Russia. A large number of young people also come to Germany from Central and Eastern Europe with the DAAD. In comparison, established researchers tend to favour Clusters of Excellence or come to Germany with support from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation (AvH). They are often from traditionally strong research regions like the USA and Western Europe. But AvH awards and fellowships also enable many researchers from China and India to work in Germany. Overall, the Funding Atlas 2015 reveals Germany's strong international position and shows that German research benefits from an international outlook.

Learn which locations researchers are most attracted to and where they come from.

Table 3-2: Number of AvH and ERC funding recipients by type of institution (xls)

Table Web-49: The most frequently selected host universities by AvH, DAAD and ERC funding recipients in the humanities and social sciences (xls)

Table Web-52: The most frequently selected host universities by AvH, DAAD and ERC funding recipients in the life sciences (xls)

Table Web-56: The most frequently selected host universities by AvH, DAAD and ERC funding recipients in the natural sciences (xls)

Table Web-61: The most frequently selected host universities by AvH, DAAD and ERC funding recipients in the engineering sciences (xls)

Figure 2-10: AvH- and DAAD-funded researchers 2009 to 2013 by country of origin and scientific discipline (png)

Figure 5-2: Internationality of Graduate Schools and Clusters of Excellence – countries of origin of participants 2013 (png)

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